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Author Guidelines

JOURNAL HELP for Authors PDF

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Aims and scope

Forest Systems (FS) is an international peer-reviewed journal. Forest Systems main aim is to integrate multidisciplinary research with forest management in complex systems with different social and ecological backgrounds. To fulfil this integrative approach, FS gives preference to papers that bring together two or more disciplines, organisms, or forest products and services. Studies of all kinds of forest systems are welcomed, particularly those that describe a wide variety of wood and non-wood products and ecosystem services, such as forests in regions with a Mediterranean climate. Forest Systems covers research findings on all aspects of forestry, such as genetics (including breeding), ecology, silviculture, forest management and policy and forest products and technology.

Manuscript categories

Forest Systems is a four-monthly journal that accepts the following manuscript categories:

Research articles make an original and significant contribution to the field of study within the scope of the journal. These articles should be of interest to a broad audience, scientifically sound, well written and concise.

Short communications must report a completed work, not preliminary findings. Articles with local-regional interest may only be accepted here or in the Resource Communications section.

Resource communications include all types of papers on resources or tools of interest for the study and management of forest systems (e.g., methodologies, software and growth models). They must report a completed work, not preliminary findings.

Reviews aim to provide an overview for an issue of great interest or topicality. Reviews will be invited by the Editorial Board. However, potential authors can suggest topics to the Editor-in-Chief. Authors must be experts and have several publications on the subject.

Peer review and editing

Forest Systems is a peer-reviewed journal. Authors must nominate a list of four potential expert reviewers in their accompanying letter. These reviewers must not have a conflict of interest with the authors or the paper content and the Editorial Board may decline to contact any of the reviewers suggested by the authors.

Upon submission, the Editor-in-Chief assesses the manuscript for suitability. Manuscripts may be rejected without peer review if they do not relate to the scope of the journal or if they do not conform to the submission rules. All other articles are allocated to Associate Editors, depending on the topic. Associate Editors maintain a global vision of their topic areas. They select relevant referees (including members of the International Scientific Committee) for single-blind peer review (the referees know the identity of the authors, but the authors do not know the identity of the referees).

Two referees are usually invited to comment on each submission. When the opinions of the referees differ significantly, the manuscript is usually sent to a third referee. When a decision has been reached, the decision is communicated to the author.

The editors' decision is final unless there is a proven error in the process of manuscript evaluation or peer review. If you believe that there has been a process error in the handling of your manuscript, please address your concerns to the Editor-in-Chief and include the manuscript submission number.

After the author has submitted the final version and this has been accepted for publication, the manuscript undergoes a copyediting process. The copyeditor performs the clean-up edit. This edit occasionally generates new queries, which are sent to the author. FS reserves the right to correct grammar, improve clarity, and impose the FS style. Authors are responsible for content, including the spelling of personal and place names. FS reserves the right to refuse publication of articles that, upon repeated resubmission, do not meet stylistic standards. When copyediting is complete, the issue is produced.

Open access

Forest Systems is an Open Access Journal and every article can be downloaded directly from the web page of the journal free of charge.

Ethic responsibilities

Previously published material is not accepted. Authors are held responsible for obtaining permission for partial reproduction of materials (text, tables, figures) included in other publications, and for accurately quoting their origin. Authorization must be requested from both the author(s) and publishers of this material.

Conflict of interest: A conflict of interest exists when professional judgment concerning a primary interest (such as the validity of research) may be influenced by a secondary interest (such as financial gain). Forest Systems expects authors to declare any commercial involvements that may represent a conflict of interest in connection with their articles.

Authorship. Following the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors recommendations (http://www.icmje.org), authorship must be based on the following four criteria:

1. Substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; AND

2. Drafting the work or revising it critically for important intellectual content; AND

3. Final approval of the version to be published; AND

4. Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work by ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

In addition to being accountable for the parts of the work he or she has done, an author should be able to identify which co-authors are responsible for specific other parts of the work. Besides, authors should have confidence in the integrity of the contributions of their coauthors.

All those designated as authors should meet all four criteria for authorship, and all who meet the four criteria should be identified as authors. Those who do not meet all four criteria should be acknowledged.

It is the authors´ collective responsibility, not the journal to which the work is submitted, to determine that all people named as authors meet all four criteria.

The corresponding author is the one individual who takes primary responsibility for communication with the journal during the manuscript submission, peer review, and publication process. The corresponding author should be available throughout the submission and peer review process to respond to editorial queries in a timely way, and should be available after publication to respond to critiques of the work and cooperate with any requests from the journal for data or additional information should questions about the paper arise after publication.

Forest Systems policy on article withdrawal

Articles that have been published shall remain extant, exact and unaltered as far as possible. However, very occasionally circumstances may arise where an article is published that must later be retracted or even removed. Such actions can only occur under exceptional circumstances, such as:

Article withdrawal: Only used for articles which represent infringements of professional ethical codes, such as multiple submission, bogus claims of authorship, plagiarism, and fraudulent use of data or the like. A retraction note titled “Retraction: [article title]” signed by the authors and/or the editor is published in the paginated part of a subsequent issue of the journal and listed in the contents list. In the electronic version, a link is made to the original article. The online article is preceded by a screen containing the retraction note. It is to this screen that the link resolves; the reader can then proceed to the article itself. The original article is retained unchanged except for a watermark on the pdf indicating on each page that it is “retracted.”

Article removal: In an extremely limited number of cases, it may be necessary to remove an article from the online database. This will only occur when the article is clearly defamatory, or infringes others’ legal rights, or when the article is, or we have a good reason to expect it will be, the subject of a court order, or when the article, if acted upon, might pose a serious health risk. In these circumstances, while the metadata (title and authors) will be retained, the text will be replaced with a screen indicating the article has been removed for legal reasons.

Submission and handling of manuscripts

Original Manuscripts

Authors must submit manuscripts via the online Open Journal System (http://www.inia.es/forestsystems). Authors may register on the site at any time, but they should register only once. During registration, authors choose a username and password. The security of manuscripts is protected by the username/password system. You may find instructions to upload a manuscript under the site SUBMITTING A MANUSCRIPT (JOURNAL HELP for authors). Please upload the entire manuscript, with tables and figures (on separate sheets but in the same document) and supplementary files, in Word format as a unique file. Separate figure files will be required later if the manuscript is accepted. A completed manuscript submission will be confirmed by e-mail through the Editorial Manager online system (http://www.inia.es/forestsystems).

Submission of a manuscript implies the following:

  • the work described has not been published previously in any language (except in a book of abstracts, in the proceedings of a scientific meeting or as part of a thesis);
  • the work is not under consideration for publication elsewhere;
  • publication of the work has been approved by all co-authors;
  • the authors agree to the automatic transfer of the copyright to the publisher if and when the manuscript is accepted for publication;
  • the manuscript will not be published elsewhere in any language without the consent of the copyright holders; and
  • written permission of the copyright holder was obtained by the authors for materials from other copyrighted sources.

When submitting a paper, we recommend uploading an accompanying letter where the authors can nominate an Associate Editor for handling and provide a list of four potential expert reviewers with full contact information and e-mail addresses.

There are no handling or page charges.

Papers reporting sequence data. Manuscripts containing primary nucleotide sequence data must be accompanied by (an) accession number(s) from an internationally available nucleotide database.

Papers reporting software. Software should be available for a period of two years after publication of the manuscript.

Papers reporting field research. Field research should indicate replications in sites and years in connexion to the addressed aims of the experiment(s). In many cases, several years may be required to account for all variations in factors that affect plant growth and development, in particular for those researches dealing with production and yield. Since the lack of this requirement can be cause of manuscript rejection during the preliminary inspection, if this recommendation is not fulfilled, arguments supporting the validity of the results must be stated and included in the manuscript accompanying letter addressed to the Editorial Office.

Supplementary material. Online annexes provide access to essential data that do not appear in the printed article but that accompany the final online version of a paper. These data are peer reviewed, must be cited in the text and are subject to the same criteria as the data published in the paper itself. Please note that supplementary files are not copyedited by FS; therefore, authors must ensure that the style of terms and figures conforms to the style of the article.

Revised manuscripts

To expedite production, authors are required to submit their revised manuscripts online, accompanied by a letter containing a detailed (point-by-point) reply to the reviewers and editor’s comments. A revised manuscript will retain its original date of receipt only if it is received within two months of the date of return to the author. Revised papers returned after this interval will be treated as new submissions. Papers will not be accepted until all required minor changes have been incorporated into the document. The revised manuscripts will be uploaded to the FS Editorial Manager online system (www.inia.es/forestsystems).

Manuscript preparation

Please upload the entire manuscript, with tables, figures and annexes, in Word format as a unique file. We encourage to use .doc files instead of .docx ones, for possible incompatibility problems. Separate figure files will be required later if the manuscript is accepted.

Manuscript format

Manuscripts should be written in Times New Roman 12-point font, with 1.5 line spacing. The four margins will be 2.5 cm. Section headings should be written 14-point font in bold print. All pages should be numbered consecutively, and line numbers should be printed on each page (starting with 1 on each page) to facilitate ease of reference for the reviewers. Each paragraph should begin with an indentation of 1-cm. Tables, figures and annexes must be included on separate sheets (but in the same Word document), one per page, following the References section.

Language: Manuscripts should be written in concise, legible English, which must be carefully reviewed by the authors for correctness of language and content. English spelling can be British or American, but it must be consistent throughout. Authors whose first language is not English are strongly advised to have their manuscripts checked by a proficient third party prior to submission.

Supplementary material (data that do not appear in the printed article but that accompany the online version), either figures or tables, should be included in the article itself, on separate sheets but in the same unique document.

Research articles should not be longer than 28 pages (or 8,500 words), including tables and figures. Research articles should include a front page, an abstract, up to seven keywords and the abbreviations used. The main text should include the following sections (see suggested layout below): introduction; material and methods; results; discussion; acknowledgments; references; tables and figures; and annexes (supplementary material), if any.

Short communications and Resource communications should be no longer than 2000 words, including tables and figures. They should include an abstract; up to seven keywords; abbreviations used; main text (divided into sections that could vary depending on the aim of the paper; references; a maximum of three tables/figures; and annexes, if any. Results and discussion may be combined, allowing a greater flexibility in the format. The manuscript title must start as "Short communication" or “Resource communication”, respectively.

Review articles (typically invited by the Editor) do not have page limitation or maximum number of references. They should include a front page (the manuscript title must contain the word "Review"); an abstract; up to seven keywords; abbreviations used; a variable main text (the introduction should be based on general coverage of the issue, followed by a critical assessment of the most important references); acknowledgments; references; tables/figures (encouraged); and annexes, if any. Reviews will also be submitted to the peer-review process.

Layout

The following layout is strongly recommended:

1. Front page.

The first page must include the following:

  • Title of the work. The title must be clear, short and concise. Avoid terms such as “Study of...”, “Observations...”, or “Contribution to...”. The title should preferably not exceed 20 words.
  • Authors´ names: if authors have more than one name, please indicate the main one in full and the secondary with an initial. We recommend hyphening in the case of more than one surname (e.g. Manuel A. Bravo, M. Luisa Torres-Cerezo). The corresponding author will be marked with an asterisk (*). When authors are associated with different institutions, each author should be marked with a superscript number indicating the corresponding author's mailing address.
  • Name and full postal address of the institution(s).
  • Corresponding author´s e-mail address and telephone number.
  • Number of tables and figures.
  • If any, number of annexes (tables and/or figures) with the following sentence: “This work has x supplementary tables and/or x supplementary figures that do not appear in the printed article but that accompany the paper online”. In the text, they will be cited as: “Suppl. Fig. S1 [pdf online]”.
  • The running title of the work, used in the heading of the pages of the printed article, should not exceed 90 characters (including spaces).

2. Abstract, keywords and abbreviations.

Abstract. The abstract length is 250 words maximum. The style must be concise and must not contain references. The structure must include the following parts: (i) aim of study, set the goal or directly the specific objectives and, describe the relevance of the study; (ii) area of study, specify the geographic area in which the study has been made; (iii) material and methods, describe briefly materials and methods, crops or organisms involved must be identified, as well as soil type, chemicals, or other details which can be important for the interpretation of the results; (iv) main results, list and discuss relevant results (including numeric values of experimental results); (v) research highlights, one or two closing sentences with most relevant findings and implications.

Additional key words. A maximum of seven keywords should be included. These should not repeat words that appear in the title.

Abbreviations used. Include a list of all non-standard abbreviations used in the paper and their meaning.

3. Text of the article

We strongly recommend that the text of the article should contain the following sections:

  • Introduction. The introduction should contain sufficient background information about the work to allow it to be placed in the context of other research and to allow the reader to understand the relevance, proposed objectives and evaluation of the results. The introduction should conclude with one or two sentences that define the objectives and the essence of the article.
  • Material and methods. Sufficient information should be provided to enable experiments to be repeated. For routine methods, a brief description and literature reference will be enough. New methods must be described in detail and, in the case of rarely used chemical products or equipment, the manufacturer’s name and address should be given.
  • Results. In general, this section should not include literature references; it should only include the results of the experiments. Interpretations of the experimental data should be reserved for the Discussion section. The explanations provided in the figure and table captions should not be repeated in the text.
  • Discussion. The discussion should not be limited to describe experimental results and drawing conclusions; it should also be analytical and interpretative and should establish an association between the results obtained and other published works. The discussion may describe conflicting opinions and the results of other authors and indicate the value of these results for future works. This section should conclude with a few sentences that summarise the most relevant conclusions and implications. Conclusions usually do not contain references but provide a short, general restatement of the main experimental results and their importance to the reader or the subject being discussed. Do not write conclusions in enumerated or bulleted paragraphs. Avoid combining the Results and Discussion sections into a single section. Forest Systems´ policy is to keep manuscripts merging the sections Results and Discussion only to those cases in which this practice is strictly necessary, or adds some value to the work. In these cases, we require a formal statement by the authors explaining their reasons to do it so. However, they can be combined in the Short and Resource communications.
  • Acknowledgements. When it is considered necessary, acknowledgements should be made to the people, centres or bodies that have collaborated or supported the carrying out of the work. Authors are responsible for obtaining the necessary permission of the people or bodies mentioned, given that the readers might infer that they endorse the data and conclusions of the article. Contributors who meet fewer than all four of the above mentioned criteria for authorship should not be listed as authors, but they should be acknowledged. The sources of financing the study, if there were any, must also be shown. The authors must also state any financial relationship that they may have and which could give rise to a conflict of interests as regards the published article. In studies which are sponsored, authors should indicate if they have had total access to the data and are responsible for the integrity and accuracy of their analysis.
  • References. When references are cited in the text, the author’s surname should be provided in parentheses, followed by a comma and the year of publication; for example, “(Westfall, 1992)...”. If there are two authors, the surnames should be followed by “&”; for example, “...(Lynch & Walsh, 2007)...”. If there are three or more authors, include the surname of the first author followed by “et al.” and a comma; for example, “... (Keller et al., 2009)...”. When several references are cited, they should be ordered from oldest to most recent; if they are from the same year, sort them alphabetically “...(Playne & McDonald, 1966; Carazo et al., 2008; Pries et al., 2008)...”.. If there are two authors with the same surname and year of publication include the initial, for example, “...Baccouri B et al., 2007; Baccouri O et al., 2007;...”. References list. It must be in alphabetic order by authors. In the case of several references from one author, papers that are sole authored should be presented first, followed by those with two authors and then references with three or more authors, respecting the chronological order in each case. If more than one of the articles was published in the same year, a letter should be added after the year to identify the reference (e.g., 2005a,b). Multi-authored works should list the first ten authors followed by “et al.”. Use abbreviated journal names. Examples are given below for literature references.References to a paper “in press” are permissible, provided that the paper in question has been accepted for publication (indicate the doi or documentary evidence of acceptance). A reference to “unpublished work” is only permissible if it contains essential information; it should be available from the cited authors on request, and the names of all persons involved should be cited [first initial(s) followed by surname] in parentheses as “unpublished data”. Any person cited as the source of a “personal communication” must have approved the reference. This type of citation is permitted in the text only, not in the list of references. The use of “in preparation” or “submitted for publication” is not permitted.
  • Tables and figures should be cited consecutively in the text, numbered independently with Arabic numerals and self-explanatory. Figures and tables must be very high quality and must be received in a suitable form and condition to be reproduced. Tables should be headed by a number and title. Explanatory notes that facilitate the interpretation of the tables should be included at the bottom of the tables. Tables should have defined cells and must not be created using the space bar and/or tab keys. Figures may correspond to diagrams or photographs. The figure number and legend should be presented at the bottom of the figure. After the acceptance of the paper, photographs should be sent separately as image files (jpg, tiff or similar) with a finished size of at least 300 dpi (dots per inch). Only under well-justified circumstances will colour photographs be admitted. Figures prepared with Excel or a similar program should be sent separately in the format of their source program (*.xls or *.xlsx files).

Checklist for style

  • Units and symbols. Use SI (International System) units in accordance with the recommendations of the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) or the Bureau for Poids et Mesures (BIPM) (http://www.bipm.org/utils/common/pdf/si_brochure_8_en.pdf).
  • Use the form g kg-1 rather than g/kg and L, mL and µL for capacity or volume units. Express N (normality) as mmol L-1 andppm as mg kg-1 ormg L-1. Please spell out numbers one through nine, except when used with units. When units are not preceded by a number, the term should be written in full, without using the symbol (e.g., “metres”, “23 m”). Express decimals using a full stop (e.g., 3.14) and thousands with commas (e.g., 21,314). For decimal quantities <1, place a zero before the decimal point. Report dates with the day first, then the month and then the year.
  • Abbreviations must be defined when first mentioned in the abstract or text [e.g., “polymerase chain reaction (PCR)”] and again in the tables and figures. Abbreviations must then be used throughout the article, except at the beginning of a sentence.
  • Style must be that of Scientific English throughout the article. Please ensure that a science editor reviews the paper before submitting it for publication.
  • Mathematical equations. Use an equation editor for mathematical expressions whenever possible. Avoid inserting formulas as images.
  • Parameters. It is a common mistake to use the term “parameters” instead of “variables” or “characters”. Variables are quantities that vary from individual to individual (e.g., length, width). By contrast, parameters do not relate to actual measurements or attributes, but to quantities that define a theoretical model; they are properties of a collection of individuals (e.g., mean and SD). In other words, you measure a variable; a parameter describes the measurements, such as the mean.
  • Never start sentences with a numeral: “Four plants and five years ago” is correct, not “4 plants and 5 years ago”. This means that some sentences may need to be rewritten: “EU countries must reduce emissions a 20% respect to 1990” instead of “20% respect to 1990 emissions must be reduced in the EU countries.”
  • Scientific names. Genus must be written in full the first time an organism is mentioned in the abstract or text and in every table and figure. If you are discussing several different species within a genus so that the genus is the same for each species mentioned, write genus + species in full the first time each new species is mentioned, even if it seems redundant. After the first time, use the genus abbreviation with a period. Genus and species are always italicised. Do not italicise "spp.", "sensu stricto" or "sensu lato", which may follow genus and species. Genus is italicised when it appears alone (i.e., Phytophthora infections). Latin binomials or trinomials and authorities, when first mentioned, must be given for all plants, insects and pathogens (e.g., Pinus pinaster Ait). Both common and chemical names of pesticides must be given when first mentioned (e.g., “Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) was most persistent...”). Identify soils at series and family level, or at least the Great Group, when first mentioned. Botanical cultivars should be marked in single inverted quotation marks, or use the abbreviation cv. when first mentioned (e.g., poplar ˈI-214ˈ or cv. I-214). Subsequently, this can be referred to as I-214 poplar or I-214 cultivar.
  • Statistical results. In-line statistical results should be presented as: (i) the test statistic followed by degrees of freedom as subscript(s), e.g., F1,12=1.74 or t8=31.8; (ii) followed by the p-value, or NS (for non-significant), e.g., F1,12=1.74, p>0.05. In tables, statistical results should be comprehensive, facilitating future meta-analyses. Depending on the details of the analyses, the results reported may include parameter estimates, test statistics, degree of freedom, significance levels and error/residual model information, e.g., error MS and d.f. in ANOVA or regression models. Because exact p-values can be useful for meta-analyses, we recommend that these be quoted even when non-significant, e.g., t23=0.25, p=0.34, or F2,32=1.12, p=0.55. However, non-significant tests (i.e., p>0.05) should always be interpreted as such and not reported.

Correction of proofs

Page proofs of articles are sent to authors as PDF files. Corrected proofs should be sent to the Editorial Office within three days by e-mail. Proofreading very occasionally generates additional queries for the author. If corrections are not received in due time, the editors reserve the right to perform the corrections that they consider most appropriate.

Examples of literature references

Journal article

Coca M, Pausas JG, 2013. Regeneration traits are structuring phylogenetic diversity in cork oak (Quercus suber) woodlands. J Veg Sci 20: 1009-1015.

Anonymous, 2005. European foresters aware of climate change. Forest Syst 18(1): 20-29.

Artis M, Suriñach J, Pons-Ayerra J, San Clemente H, Navarro M, Ladouce N, Wincker P, Camacho J, Rodriguez M, Diez-Herrero MV et al., 2011. Development and functional annotation of an 11,303-EST collection from Eucalyptus for studies of cold tolerance. Tree Genet Genomes 5: 317-327..

Book

Lynch M, Walsh B, 1997. Genetics and analysis of quantitative traits. Sinauer Assoc, Sunderland, MA, USA. 980 pp.

MARM, 2008. Anuario de estadística agroalimentaria. Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Medio Rural y Marino, Madrid. 250 pp.

Chapters of books

Westfall RD, 1992. Developing seed transfer zones. In: Handbook of quantitative forest genetics (Fins L, Friedman ST, Brotschol JV, eds). Springer, The Netherlands. pp: 313-398.

Doctoral or master thesis

Gordo J, 2004. Selección de grandes productores de fruto de Pinus pinea L. en la Meseta Norte. Doctoral thesis. Universidad Politécnica, Madrid.

Conference proceedings

Agúndez D, Notivol E, 1994. Annual rhythm height growth variation in Scots pine provenances. Proc II IUFRO Int Conf on Scots Pine Breeding and Genetics, Kaunas (Lithuania), September 12-14. pp. 7-12.

Electronic sources

When referencing electronic sources, please provide place of publication (URL, ftp address, etc.) and date accessed or date of last update for web pages. For example:

Nakicenovic N, Swart R, 2005. Special report on emissions scenarios. IPCC Special Reports on Climate Change. Available in http://www.grida.no/publications/other/ipcc_sr/. [2 March 2010].

Work documents

Comité de Gestión de Coníferas, 2003. Report 2000/2001. Work document for internal use.

Miravete EJ, 1999. Aplicación de los modelos de elección discreta al análisis de la adopción de innovaciones tecnológicas. Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas. Valencia, Spain. EC work document 99-04.

Legal documents

BOE, 1996. Royal decree 2210/1995, of 13 November, that modifies the organic structure of the Health and Safety Board. Boletín Oficial del Estado No. 21, 24/1/1996.

OJ, 1990. Directive 90/429/EC of the Council of June 26. Official Journal of the European Union L 224 18/08/1990. p. 62.

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The work described has not been published previously in any language (except in the form of an abstract or as part of a thesis)

  2. The manuscript is not under consideration for publication elsewhere

  3. Authors have followed the author guidelines for the preparation of the manuscript. One pdf file containing text and Tables/Figures; an Accompanying letter presenting  the work; and, optionally, a file with Supplementary Information, are provided.

  4. Its publication has been approved by all co-authors, if any, as well as by the responsible authorities at the institution where the work has been carried out

  5. The authors agree to the automatic transfer of the copyright to the publisher if and when the manuscript is accepted for publication

  6. The manuscript will not be published elsewhere in any language without the consent of the copyright holders
  7. Written permission of the copyright holder had been obtained by the authors for the materials used from other copyrighted sources
 

Copyright Notice

Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:

  1. Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.
  2. Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.
  3. Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See The Effect of Open Access).

 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be available for any other purpose or another person.

 


Webpage: www.inia.es/Forestsystems