Radial variation of anatomical features, wood density and decay resistance in teak (Tectona grandis) from two qualities of growing sites and two climatic regions of Costa Rica

  • R. Moya Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica.Cartago
  • A. Berrocal Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica.Cartago
  • J. R. Serrano Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica.Cartago
  • M. Tomazello Fo ESALQ/Universidade de São Paulo.São Paulo
Keywords: TECTONA GRANDIS, PLANTATIONS, SITE FACTORS, CLIMATE, JUVENILE WOOD, WOOD ANATOMY, DENSITY, RESISTANCE TO INJURIOUS FACTORS, FUNGI, X RAYS, COSTA RICA

Abstract

The objective of this study was to show the radial variation of some anatomic characteristics, wood density and natural durability of teak (Tectona grandis L.F.) growing in Costa Rica. Samples of trees 13 years old were obtained from two growing sites (high and low growing) of plantations established in a humid tropical climate (CHT) and dry tropical climate (CST). The variables measured of the fibers as well as for the rays were not affected by the climate or the type of growing site, except for the length of the fibers. The fibers of teak wood from the best growing site were significantly larger. Vessels were found with a greater frequency for the CST but mostly solitary in comparison with the CHAverage density, maximum density and the variation within the ring presented a light higher magnitude for the CSThe quality of the growing site did not affect these variables. The resistance of fungus attack was similar in the area of heartwood near the pith compared to the heartwood near the sapwood for all the conditions evaluated. Nevertheless, it was observed in some trees a similar resistance of fungus attack for areas of sapwood compared to similar areas of heartwood.

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Published
2009-08-01
How to Cite
MoyaR., BerrocalA., SerranoJ. R., & Tomazello FoM. (2009). Radial variation of anatomical features, wood density and decay resistance in teak (Tectona grandis) from two qualities of growing sites and two climatic regions of Costa Rica. Forest Systems, 18(2), 119-131. https://doi.org/10.5424/fs/2009182-01055
Section
Research Articles