Short Communication. Natural durability of reed (Phragmites australis) against wood decay organisms: relation to other forest species

  • M. T. Troya
  • F. Rubio
  • M. J. Prieto
  • D. Lorenzo
  • J. L. Fernández-Cabo
  • R. Schöftner
Keywords: Reed, sustainable noise barrier, durability, wood decay organisms

Abstract

This work presents the research carried out to determine the natural durability of reed (Phragmites communis) from the Fertö region of Hungary against wood decay organisms, with the objective of obtaininig information to be used as a constituent element in outdoor use, and in particular, in a viable and sustainable motorway noise barrier. Phragmites communis is a large perennial grass of considerable size which grows in temperate and tropical wetland zones throughout the world. Its growth is expansive and it frequently invades wetlands where it competes with the native species and therefore requires regular removal so that an excess of organic material is not produced in the habitat. In addition, the invasion by this plant of polluted waters also appears to have a beneficial effect, so it can be used as a natural water purifier and thus has a potential use as a purification method for wetlands contaminated by agricultural practices. Due to the need for its periodic extraction, its possible use as a construction material, although in a secondary role, gives it an added value for which further scientific study is required. In the absence of a reference Standard and being reed a lignocellulose material, the study of its natural durability has been based on the existing Standards for wood. The tests show that Hungarian reed has a high level of durability against some fungi and other wood decay organisms. Key words: Reed, sustainable noise barrier, durability, wood decay organisms.

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Published
2009-12-01
How to Cite
TroyaM. T., RubioF., PrietoM. J., LorenzoD., Fernández-CaboJ. L., & SchöftnerR. (2009). Short Communication. Natural durability of reed (Phragmites australis) against wood decay organisms: relation to other forest species. Forest Systems, 18(3), 289-295. https://doi.org/10.5424/fs/2009183-01069
Section
Research Articles