A new and rapid micropropagation protocol for Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden

  • Anabel-Viviana Di-Gaudio 1 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Laboratorio de Relaciones Hídricas - Acuaporinas. No. 2. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. 2 CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental y Aplicada (IBBEA), CONICET-Universidad de Buenos Aires.
  • Esteban Tubert 1 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Laboratorio de Relaciones Hídricas - Acuaporinas. No. 2. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. 2 CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental y Aplicada (IBBEA), CONICET-Universidad de Buenos Aires.
  • Leandro-Ezequiel Laino 1 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Laboratorio de Relaciones Hídricas - Acuaporinas. No. 2. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. 2 CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental y Aplicada (IBBEA), CONICET-Universidad de Buenos Aires.
  • Jose-María Chaín 1 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Laboratorio de Relaciones Hídricas - Acuaporinas. No. 2. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. 2 CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental y Aplicada (IBBEA), CONICET-Universidad de Buenos Aires.
  • Sandra-Irene Pitta-Alvarez 3 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Laboratorio de Cultivo Experimental de Plantas y Microalgas. No. 68. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. 4 CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Micología y Botánica (INMIBO). Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires.
  • Gabriela Amodeo 1 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Laboratorio de Relaciones Hídricas - Acuaporinas. No. 2. Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. 2 CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental y Aplicada (IBBEA), CONICET-Universidad de Buenos Aires.
  • Jose-Javier Regalado-Gonzalez Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Micología y Botánica (INMIBO). http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1664-2000

Abstract

Aim of the study: We developed a faster micropropagation protocol specifically designed for Eucalyptus grandis. Eucalyptus breeding programs use micropropagation protocols to obtain high quality cloned seedlings, but current protocols are excessively time consuming.

Area of the study: The protocol has been developed in Argentina, but it can be applied in anywhere.

Materials and methods: We used nodal segments as initial explants to obtain micropropagated shoots, which were then simultaneously rooted ex vitro and acclimated in a hydroponic system. Nodal segments were cultured in a MS medium supplemented with 1 mg l-1 6-benzylaminopurine, 30 g l-1 sucrose, 1 g l-1 active charcoal and 8 g l-1 agar and incubated for four weeks at 25 ± 2°C under 16 h day photoperiod. Then, micropropagated shoots were exposed 15 seconds to 5000 ppm indol-butyric acid prior to being transferred to a hydroponic system, allowing simultaneous ex vitro rooting and acclimatization.

Main results: 73 ± 9% of nodal segments grew to generate 1.73 ± 1.03 shoots per explant (length: 0.76 ± 0.44 cm). After four weeks in hydroponic system, 46 ± 4 % of micropropagated shoots developed roots, which represents an acceptable and intermediate rate of success, compared to the reported in vitro rooting rates.

Research highlights: Our protocol allowed to obtain micropropagated seedlings in a total timespan of 8 weeks. Our results show that, by utilizing a hydroponic system, traditional protocols to micropropagate Eucalyptus can be substantially enhanced, allowing for improved production dynamics and potentially resulting in better organized seedling manufacturing facilities.

Keywords: Woody plants; silviculture; nursery seedlings; rooting methods; hydroponics; acclimatization.

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References

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Published
2020-05-14
How to Cite
Di-GaudioA.-V., TubertE., LainoL.-E., ChaínJ.-M., Pitta-AlvarezS.-I., AmodeoG., & Regalado-GonzalezJ.-J. (2020). A new and rapid micropropagation protocol for Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden. Forest Systems, 29(1), eSC04. https://doi.org/10.5424/fs/2020291-15965
Section
Short communications