Role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum induced by genistein on soybean stressed by water deficit

  • M.C. Nápoles Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Agrícolas.San José de las Lajas, La Habana
  • E. Guevara Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria..Pergamino
  • F. Montero Rizobacter Argentina S.A..Pergamino
  • A. Rossi Rizobacter Argentina S.A..Pergamino
  • A. Ferreira Rizobacter Argentina S.A..Pergamino
Keywords: GLYCINE MAX, DROUGHT STRESS, ROOT NODULATION, NITROGEN FIXING BACTERIA, INOCULATION, BRADYRHIZOBIUM JAPONICUM, GENISTEIN, DROUGHT RESISTANCE

Abstract

The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is a crop mainly grown under rain fed conditions although irrigation is increasingly being used. Water deficiency is the main factor limiting seed production. The symbiosis process is also negatively affected by water stress. The isoflavone genistein have been recognized as a powerful inducer of Nod factors production by Bradyrhizobium and its addition to inocula has been shown to increase nodule number and promote soybean nitrogen (N) fixation at low temperatures. This study looks for answers about the possible role of genistein in countering the stress on nodulation produced by water deficit in soybeans. Bradyrhizobium japonicum SEMIA 5079 was grown in culture media induced or not induced with genistein. Inocula were applied to plants growing at different moisture levels. The effect of the treatments on nodulation and N content was evaluated.An improved response to drought stress was observed when the bacteria were grown in presence of genistein as a Nod factors inducer. Nodulation values under moisture stress differed from 8.9 nodules/plant with genistein at 10 micro M to 1.8 nodules/plant when no inducer was used. Genistein reduced the negative effect on nodulation caused by water deficiency.

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Published
2009-09-01
How to Cite
NápolesM., GuevaraE., MonteroF., RossiA., & FerreiraA. (2009). Role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum induced by genistein on soybean stressed by water deficit. Spanish Journal of Agricultural Research, 7(3), 665-671. https://doi.org/10.5424/sjar/2009073-451
Section
Plant physiology